New study says increased exercise doesn’t always lead to burning more calories throughout the day

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It seems the human body tries to balance itself out all the time. This makes sense if you think about it. Your body is always trying to survive. If you fast your body’s metabolism will slow so you don’t starve to death too quickly. If you eat frequently your metabolism fires up in order to try to get rid of excess calories consumed. And now a new study shows that if you exercise too much your body will compensate by restricting calorie burn during the times you’re more sedentary.

According to new research led by the University of Roehampton and published on 16 August 2021, people who take part in regular exercise burn fewer calories on body maintenance than people who don’t do any strenuous activity, dramatically reducing the calorie-burning gains of exercise.

Using data from the International Atomic Energy Agency’s Doubly-labelled water database of over 1,750 adults, researchers found that the calories the body burns to exist (known as basal energy expenditure, basal metabolic rate or BMR for short) decreases by 28% during periods when daily exercise levels are consistently high.

BMR accounts for approximately 60–75% of total daily energy expenditure in individuals, way more than calories burned during recreational activities such as running or cycling. A significant reduction in BMR can effectively counterbalance the positive calorie-burning effects of frequent exercising.

In short, the more we exercise over the long term, the fewer calories our bodies burn for the most rudimentary activities, therefore reducing the overall calories we burn per day.

Regular exercise may hinder weight loss says new research but I disagree – here’s why | T3

Don’t stop exercising though! My take away from the recent news on this and the energy balance model versus the carbohydrate insulin model is the secret to losing or maintaining your weight is some combination of all this information that is customized to the person. You have to learn what is right for you.

The energy balance model simply says you have to expend more calories than you take in to lose weight. I think this is true to an extent. The carbohydrate insulin model says that reducing carbohydrates aids in weight loss or maintenance because reducing carbs in the diet makes a person more insulin sensitive which in turn prevents energy from being stored as fat. I also think this is true to an extent. Exercise will burn more calories for you throughout the day than if you did nothing at all and that could aid in weight loss and/or maintenance. I think this is true to an extent.

In my life I try to evaluate how my body reacts to certain foods. I exercise, not for weight loss, but for fitness. Diet and exercise combined serves my cause to maintain strength, flexibility, and balance as I get older. I’ll hit 55 this year and my fitness and weight goals are to simply stay around 165 lbs. to 175 lbs., be able to lift 90 lbs. to 100 lbs. in various exercises, be able to stand on one foot in various poses, and be able to touch the floor while bending forward. If I can continue this for the next 30 years I think my remaining years I can binge on Resse’s Peanut Butter Cups to my heart’s content.

It’s Never Too Late for Older Adults to Lose Weight

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By Jennifer Scott of spiritfinder.org

You’re not as young as you once were, but that’s no reason to resign yourself to a life stuck on the couch. Sedentary lifestyles have been proven to negatively impact a person’s overall health, and can even bring on obesity and other health complications. Instead of believing you are too old to lose weight, make the choice to change your current situation and get back to feeling good about yourself. Here is some advice from Keto Kooking for losing weight and wellness.

Start Small

Beginning is always the hardest part of losing weight. You want results fast and are just ready to get this “diet thing” over with so you can go back to feeling good about yourself, but results don’t come easy. According to ZenBusiness, when you go too hard and fast, you run the risk of back to your old habits.

As the adage goes, it’s a marathon—not a sprint. Start small with your exercise. Go for 30-minute walks. Do daily stretching and aerobics from home in the evening before you go to bed. You shouldn’t have to go all out on a gym membership or punish yourself with hours-long routines. Start small and build up to where you want to be over time by letting your results motivate your intensity. By committing to making one small change each month, it will become a part of your routine.

Get Into a Routine

The idea of falling into a routine is a little more abstract than telling someone to go to the gym, or to start eating kale, which is why many weight-loss strategies fail to include this vital component. Routines introduce regularity into your life, which is crucial for you to methodically achieve your weight-loss goals. Grab yourself a daily planner and schedule out your weekly routine. Make note of what times you’ll be eating, working out and sleeping. By adopting your lifestyle to revolve around your weight loss, you’ll find it easier to keep progressing along your wellness journey.

Eat for Energy, Eat Light

Another important aspect of your weight loss are the foods that you choose to put into your body. As an older adult, there are a few challenges you have to face when it comes to digestion. Things can sometimes move a little slow, which is why you shouldn’t skip dairy products to ingest necessary probiotics to help move things along. Yogurt is an excellent, healthy snack that can help your body stay regular and efficiently digest foods. Focus on smaller portions and choose foods that give you a boost of energy to stay up and active throughout the day. In terms of which diet to choose, you may want to give keto a try and see if it works for you. Keto Kooking offers great advice and recipes to help you along the way.

Ditch the Scale

After the first few days of diet and exercise, you may feel the need to hop on the scale and see how much weight you’ve lost. The problem with using scales to measure progress is that you often become blind to the other ways that weight loss is meant to affect your life.

When it comes to scales, people get so caught up in the numbers game that they forget to see how much better they feel when eating good food, going to bed on time and exercising regularly. If you only focus on the numbers, you won’t notice all the other ways you’ve been making progress, so instead of living by the scale, toss it out. More importantly, it’s not about what you read on the scale, it’s about how you feel. It’s the choices we make that define who we are and what kind of lives we lead. By choosing to live healthily, you are making your golden years shine a little brighter.

Image by janeb13 from Pixabay

Meta analysis of clinical trials show ketogenic diet superior to reduce weight and improvements for diabetics

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Good news for those interested in starting the ketogenic diet or at least wanting to go low carb.

The findings of this review show a significant effect of the ketogenic diet as compared to controls in terms of weight reduction, glycemic control, and improved lipid profile. A noticeable improvement was seen in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and in high-density lipoprotein (HDL), favoring the ketogenic diet as compared to control. Conclusion This review concludes that the ketogenic diet is superior to controls in terms of glycemic control and lipid profile improvements, and the results are significant enough to recommend it as an adjunctive treatment for type two diabetes.

PubMed.gov

Turns out breakfast is not the most important meal of the day.

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If you’re trying to lose weight it seems that breakfast hurts way more than it helps.

As the quality of the included studies was mostly low, the findings should be interpreted with caution. Currently, the available evidence does not support modification of diets in adults to include the consumption of breakfast as a good strategy to lose weight. We also found that overall, modifying diets to include breakfast consumption was associated with an increase in total daily calories. While breakfast has been advocated as the most important meal of the day in the media since 1917 there is a paucity of evidence to support breakfast consumption as a strategy to achieve weight loss, including in adults with overweight or obesity. Although eating breakfast regularly could have other important effects, such as improved concentration and attentiveness levels in childhood, caution is needed when recommending breakfast for weight loss in adults, as it could have the opposite effect.

bmj.com