Flat Iron Steak with Eggplant Ragu

Entrees, Recipes

Ingredients

1 1/2 lb. Flat Iron Steak – Sliced into thin strips
4 tbsp Olive Oil
1 lb. Eggplant – Cut into 1 inch chunks
14.5 oz. Can of Diced Tomatoes
4 cloves Garlic – Minced
2 tsp Dried Oregano
3/4 tsp Ground Cinnamon
1/2 cup Fresh Mint Leaves – Rough Chopped
1.5 oz. Feta Cheese – Crumbled
  Salt & Pepper to Taste

Directions

In a large skillet brown the steak in 2 tbsp of olive oil and set aside

In the same skillet, over medium high heat add 2 tbsp olive oil and eggplant, 1 tsp salt, and cook until eggplant is slightly softened. Reduce heat to medium and add the can of tomatoes and all juices, garlic, oregano, and cinnamon. Cook until slightly thickened, about 5 minutes. Add the steak and any juices back to the skillet and 1/4 cup of mint. Stir briefly and set aside.

Arrange steak on a platter and spoon ragu over the top. Or serve in a small bowl. Finish by sprinkling crumbled feta cheese and remaining fresh mint.

Why science is never settled

Blog

Nina Teicholz wrote an op-ed in the LA Times today that talks about the new analysis of scientific studies surrounding red meat and how there is no conclusive evidence, one way or the other, as to red meat’s benefit or harm. It’s important reading because it highlights what is prevalent in all science lately. The attempt to shout down the voices of those that don’t agree with the current “consensus”.

The answer is that many of the nation’s official nutrition recommendations — including the idea that red meat is a killer — have been based on a type of weak science that experts have unfortunately become accustomed to relying upon. Now that iffy science is being questioned. At stake are deeply entrenched ideas about healthy eating and trustworthy nutrition guidelines, and with many scientists invested professionally, and even financially, in the status quo, the fight over the science won’t be pretty.

LA Times