Vegan website claims keto diets damage your heart… unless it’s the vegan version

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The beet above is better than The Beet below

Any honest site reporting on ketogenic diets will tell you that you can go keto whether you concentrate on animal or plants. The difference is in satiety. An animal based approach to the keto diet will leave you feeling more satisfied for longer periods of time. A plant based approach will mean you will have to eat more often because plants are mostly fiber that pass through your body.

The key to a ketogenic diet is in limiting insulin response. You need to eat foods that do not trigger a huge rush of insulin. Insulin will cause glucose in your blood to be stored as fat. Ketones will cause your cells to release fat so you produce your own glucose.

The Beet is extremely dishonest and contradictory. They start out their article claiming a keto diet will cause heart scarring due to ketones in your bloodstream.

Keto diets put your body into a state of ketosis, or burning fat for fuel, which releases acids called ketones into the bloodstream that are now believed to be damaging to your heart muscle. The scientists looked at the cellular impact of ketones on the heart and found that when ketones are formed, they can have a detrimental impact on your heart, causing permanent scar tissue to form, which itself hinders the heart’s ability to pump blood properly.

The Beet

Then they contradict themselves by reporting that you can do a keto diet in a healthy way as long as you leave out the saturated fat and protein.

Keto diets are not unhealthy, it’s the way people do them that is, according to Dr. Andrew Freeman, the cardiologist at National Jewish in Denver, recently released a study that keto dieting can lead to heart disease because of the foods people eat while on the diet: People often load up on red meat, processed meat like bacon, and stay away from healthy plant-based foods like fruits, vegetables, and whole grains–which are all nutrient-rich and full of antioxidants–because they happen to contain carbs.

The Beet

Then they launch into the same tired trope of saturated fat is bad. This was already disproven.

Meanwhile, another leading cardiologist, Dr. Kim Williams, former president of the American College of Cardiology, told Plant Based News that “no one should do a ketogenic diet” since the way these diets are interpreted are often full of bacon and eggs, butter, and cheese, all of which are long-term threats to a healthy heart. The saturated fat in these animal foods is known to raise cholesterol and lead to blockages and plaque that can raise blood pressure and cause heart attack and stroke. His point of view:  No one should adopt the ketogenic diet over the long term—unless weight loss is more important than lifespan.

The Beet

And they end with the kicker of how a plant based diet is better for you than anything else.

Bottom Line: A plant-based diet works better and is healthier for your heart. In another unrelated study, a plant-based diet of whole foods was shown to beat out keto for weight loss and burning fat faster.

The Beet

They are not telling the truth here.

Image by Tracy Lundgren from Pixabay

Healthy fats for the Keto Diet

News

While the article seems a little behind the times regarding meat and saturated fats there is still some good information for people looking for a substitute for vegetable oils and/or seed oils. If you’re in the store and don’t know what to choose here are some good alternatives.

What is clear is that unsaturated fat has a positive impact on health. In 2016, researchers investigated a large population study that had followed people for three decades. They found that consuming higher amounts of unsaturated fat was associated with a lower risk of mortality.

According to Harvard School of Health, foods that contain unsaturated fat include:

avocados and avocado oil

nuts, such as walnuts, macadamias, almonds, and Brazil nuts

seeds, such as flax and pumpkin seeds

oily fish, such as salmon, tuna, anchovies, and sardines

olives and olive oil

These are all healthful sources of fat for people following the keto diet.

Medical News Today

They are also a little behind the times with regard to protein and staying in ketosis. In general, if you are fat adapted (meaning converted to burning fat rather than glucose) it is quite easy to remain in ketosis. I’ve been living this way for a long time and my diet focuses on protein first with added fat and other things after. I always build my meals around the source of protein first. I have no trouble remaining in ketosis even after having a weekend of eating some carbs.

The science is in! To lower your cholesterol avoid carbs.

News

At least that’s what’s being said this week. Personally from all the books I’ve read on the topic it seems obvious to me that saturated fats from animal products don’t cause any harm whatsoever while highly processed fats from plant sources do a great deal of harm. It also makes common sense since there was no one refining seeds to make oils when man was in his primitive state.

Diamond and his co-authors say following a low-carb diet is most effective for people at increased risk of heart disease, such as those who are overweight, hypertensive and diabetic. Their findings are consistent with another paper recently published in the “Journal of the American College of Cardiology,” which provided strong evidence that food that raises blood sugar, such as bread, potatoes and sweets, should be minimized, rather than tropical oils and animal-based food.

Science Daily

The saturated fat falacy

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Professor Timothy Noakes is writing a series of articles to try to put the nail in the coffin of the modern western diet and dispatch forever the shoddy work of Ancel Keys.

This is why you should immediately distrust anyone that says, “The science is settled.” Science by it’s very nature is never settled. Those people saying these things are more likely than not just like Ancel Keys. Pushing their theories and searching desperately for studies to confirm their own bias.

This first article is a great read.

So when, in the late 1960s, Keys became one of the original beneficiaries of research funding from the newly formed National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), he discovered, to his utter dismay (and perhaps horror) that, far from supporting his claims, his brilliantly designed and perfectly executed test — the Minnesota Coronary Experiment  (MCE) (6) — comprehensively disproved both his hypotheses. According to Karl Popper’s description that a real scientist is someone imbued with a “ruthless scepticism toward your own work,” had Keys been just such a scientist, this should have been the end of his hypotheses.

The MCE established that the replacement of dietary saturated fat with the polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) linoleic acid, which lowered average blood cholesterol concentrations by 15% to the apparently “safe” level of 175 mg/dL (4.6 mmol/L), had absolutely no effect on heart disease outcomes. Instead, “no differences between the treatment and control groups were observed for cardiovascular events, cardiovascular deaths or total mortality” (6, p. 129).

This finding fatally dispatched Keys’ hypotheses because the MCE established that, when tested in a rigorous and essentially flawless trial, using Keys’ dietary recommendations to lower cholesterol failed to prevent CHD as Keys had promised.

crossfit.com

How many eggs a week are too many?

Keto, News, Opinion

An article from the Cleveland Clinic tells us there is no current recommendation as to how many eggs are too many and then goes on to tell us that too many eggs are bad.

I think if you’re suffering from heart disease then you need to keep a close watch on your cholesterol with your doctor. Your test results should be the determining factor as to what you eat and how much.

“There is no current recommendation on how many eggs you should consume each week,” says Zumpano. “Research indicates that total saturated fat contributes more to LDL (bad) cholesterol than dietary cholesterol.”
She points out that egg whites are safe and a good source of protein. It is egg yolks that have the cholesterol and saturated fat you’re trying to avoid.

The Cleveland Clinic

D’Marge Magazine marginalizes followers of low carb and keto diets

Keto, News

Passing off people who are on a low carb diet as cultists who ignore science is not a good way to put forth your argument. Especially since there is now a great deal of science behind the benefits of going low carb.

While a diet high in full-fat dairy, butter, ghee and coconut oil can help us feel fuller for longer and reduce our sugar cravings, too much saturated fat raises cholesterol levels in the blood, which can lead to “furred up” arteries and an increased chance of having a heart attack or stroke.

D’Marge

The quote above from the article is highly simplistic with its claims regarding cholesterol. We now know in order to determine if you have a cholesterol problem that you need to do a deep dive into your HDL and LDL levels. It’s far more complex than just seeing higher levels.

As to why we have the rates of obesity and diabetes that we do? While low carb high-fat proponents say it’s because the food pyramid is a lie, medical professionals at places like the British Dietetic Association “believe it’s less that the guidelines are wrong, and more that we aren’t following them,” (BBC).

D’Marge

Anyone who has looked into the “Food Pyramid” knows that it is, in fact, a lie. It’s based on faulty science perpetrated by Ancel Keys and the agriculture and processed food industries.

The article gives some bad advice as its conclusion by telling its readers to swap out saturated fat for whole grains (bad), high quality protein (good), non-saturated fats (bad), fresh fruit (bad), and vegetables (can be good). At least they do recommend staying away from sugar and refined carbohydrates.