The body’s hydration signals in older men may be impaired

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Older men’s bodies may not provide the signals necessary to let them know they need to drink. In a new study on 10 younger men (18 to 30 years old) and 10 older men (54 to 67 years old) it was found that dehydration in older adults does not lead as easily to an increase in body temperature. The body then does not react to create sweat and thirst to signal that it is time to hydrate.

I’m almost 54 years old. I have never brought water with me to a workout. I find I just don’t get thirsty until it’s over. But, even as a kid, we used to go out and play sports for hours on end and no one brought water with them. Maybe I’m just conditioned to exercise without drinking.

Scientists have suggested that the reason that older adults feel less thirsty is due to a reduced ability to detect and respond to the level of salt in their blood.

When the balance between water and salt in the blood tips toward salinity, the body of a younger adult responds with feelings of thirst.

The researchers wondered if the same reduced ability to track blood salinity, or “osmolality,” that reduces sensations of thirst may also be the driver behind the less extreme response to dehydration in older adults.

Medical News Today

Intermittent fasting and exercise motivation?

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First of all, what is Slashgear doing posting about Intermittent Fasting? These tech web sites must really be reaching for readers because this has nothing to do with tech. I think the idea is that this is science and science is somewhere in the realm of tech. Not really.

In addition to its other potential health benefits, intermittent fasting may cause hormone changes that boost one’s motivation to exercise. The findings were detailed in a study recently published in the Journal of Endocrinology, where researchers explain that intermittent fasting — as well as general meal restriction — boosts the ‘hunger hormone’ ghrelin and its ability to boost exercise motivation.

Slashgear

Intermittent Fasting and exercise

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The question is being asked if it is safe to exercise and also intermittently fast. First, let’s get something straight. If you don’t eat breakfast and you work out first thing in the morning you’re exercising in a relative fasted state. Hardly anyone would question a person’s ability to do this. It’s not that hard.

While there are lots of different ways to do it—the 16:8 diet, OMAD (one meal a day), the 5:2 diet—the basic idea of intermittent fasting is to your limit your eating to a particular window of time. After trying a bunch of different protocols, I finally settled on 18:6, meaning I fast for 18 hours a day and eat during a six-hour window, from 2 to 8 p.m. each day. From an eating standpoint, it was one of the easiest things I’ve ever done; I’m not usually hungry until about then anyhow.

Yet there was one thing that’s always bothered me. How was it affecting my body when it came to exercise? I work out six days a week, doing a mix of cardio, yoga, and weight lifting. My workouts are non-negotiable, as they are essential to dealing with my lifelong depression and anxiety issues. While I’ve always felt fine working out in a fasted state, I’ve wondered if maybe I was doing some kind of long-term damage and just didn’t realize it yet. So I decided to find out.

Women’s Health

The power of the push-up

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Turns out that the ability to do push-ups is an indicator of how healthy you might be… huh… who would’ve thought it? Hahaha. Seriously, though, did you know that only 20% to 30% of people are able to do at least one push-up? Now that’s news.

Granted, Joyner and other experts I heard from estimated that the number of Americans who can do a single push-up is likely only about 20 or 30 percent. But that’s an issue of practice more than destiny. “Most people could get to the point of doing 30 or 40—unless they have a shoulder problem or are really obese,” Joyner says.
Doing things that produce tangible, short-term results can lead to a domino effect of health behaviors. “If someone reads this article and starts doing push-ups, it would be a statement about their general conscientiousness and motivation,” says Joyner, “and that speaks to so many other health behaviors. People who follow guidelines, eat well, get their kids vaccinated—they tend to engage in other healthy behaviors.”

The Atlantic