Meta analysis of clinical trials show ketogenic diet superior to reduce weight and improvements for diabetics

Keto, News

Good news for those interested in starting the ketogenic diet or at least wanting to go low carb.

The findings of this review show a significant effect of the ketogenic diet as compared to controls in terms of weight reduction, glycemic control, and improved lipid profile. A noticeable improvement was seen in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and in high-density lipoprotein (HDL), favoring the ketogenic diet as compared to control. Conclusion This review concludes that the ketogenic diet is superior to controls in terms of glycemic control and lipid profile improvements, and the results are significant enough to recommend it as an adjunctive treatment for type two diabetes.

PubMed.gov

25% of COVID-19 deaths in England had diabetes

News

More than a quarter of all NHS patients who have died after being infected with Covid-19 had diabetes, according to new statistics from NHS England.

Between 31 March and 12 May, a total of 5,873 patients with diabetes died in hospital from Covid-19, 26 per cent of all coronavirus deaths.

It’s the first time data on hospital deaths and underlying health conditions have been revealed by the NHS.

UK Independent

Worse outcomes for COVID-19 patients with Diabetes

News

If there aver was a time to reduce your carb consumption this is it. Those with diabetes seem to have a much worse time with the COVID-19 virus. More than ever before Metabolic Health is important.

While anyone is susceptible to contracting the new coronavius, people with diabetes or metabolic syndrome — a cluster of conditions that, occurring together, increase the likelihood of developing diabetes — are among those most at risk of becoming gravely ill if they get COVID-19.

Dallas Morning News

Metabolic Health looks to be the new focus in fighting COVID-19

News, Opinion

Story after story crops up regarding the COVID-19 pandemic and its effects on people who have Type-2 Diabetes and/or are obese. The virus seems to affect people with these conditions regardless of age. Many times I’ve seen reports of a relatively young person (below 40 years old) with no underlying health conditions dying from the virus. Then when the show the photo of the person they appear to be obese.

What is the underlying cause of Type-2 Diabetes and obesity? Doctors on social media keep referring to “metabolic syndrome” and “metabolic health.” And it appears that this goes back to insulin resistance and the low carb movement in diet.

Carbohydrate consumption triggers a flood of insulin in your blood stream. The more this happens the more your body adjusts to having so much of it in your blood. This makes insulin less effective at doing its job thereby increasing the flow of insulin in your body. This leads to the viscous cycle in diabetics of increasing their insulin dosage to get their blood sugar levels down. Which in turn makes them less sensitive to insulin. Which in turn requires higher doses. The use of insulin is heavily tied to weight gain because glucose is removed from your blood and shoved into your fat cells.

All this information is in Dr. Jason Fung’s books, “The Obesity Code” and “The Diabetes Code.

So it may seem that the best defense against COVID-19 is to get our metabolic health in order. That requires reducing consumption of carbohydrates and highly processed foods. Getting back to the basics of meat and vegetables and cooking at home looks like the best treatment. It requires no pharmaceuticals and will help with weight loss. The best part is you don’t have to spend money on fancy diet books or weight loss programs.

Obesity may be one of the most important predictors of severe coronavirus illness, new studies say. It’s an alarming finding for the United States, which has one of the highest obesity rates in the world.

Though people with obesity frequently have other medical problems, the new studies point to the condition in and of itself as the most significant risk factor, after only older age, for being hospitalized with Covid-19, the illness caused by the coronavirus. Young adults with obesity appear to be at particular risk, studies show.

New York Times

But Dr. David A. Kessler, a former commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, has a simple message for people who want to keep their metabolic health and weight in check when temptation is just a few steps from their work space: Try to avoid eating foods that contain what he calls “fast carbs,” such as refined grains, starches, corn and sugar.

These foods, like bagels, bread, breakfast cereals, juices, tortilla chips and anything made with processed flour, tend to be highly processed and devoid of fiber. They are rapidly absorbed and converted to glucose in the body, causing blood sugar and insulin levels to spike and preventing the release of hormones that quench hunger. Over time, researchers have found, this pattern of eating can wreak havoc on metabolic health, leading to weight gain and increasing the risk of Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, conditions that can increase the risk of complications from Covid-19.

New York Times

Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) seems to be a risk factor for acquiring the new coronavirus infection. Indeed, T2DM and hypertension have been identified as the most common comorbidities for other coronavirus infections, such as severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS-CoV)1. According to several reports, including those from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), patients with T2DM and the metabolic syndrome might have up to ten-times greater risk of death when they contract COVID-19 (CDC coronavirus reports). Although T2DM and the metabolic syndrome increase the risk of more severe symptoms and mortality in many infectious diseases, there are some additional specific mechanistic aspects in coronavirus infections that require separate consideration, which will have clinical consequences for improved management of patients who are severely affected.

nature.com

A recent commentary In Nature states that “patients with type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome might have to up 10 times greater risk of death when they contract COVID-19” and has called for mandatory glucose and metabolic control of type 2 diabetes patients to improve outcomes. The authors also suggest making this a priority in ALL patients with COVID 19 will be beneficial. (12) It’s instructive to note that the disproportionate numbers of those from black and ethnic minority backgrounds succumbing to the virus may in part be explained by a significantly increased risk of chronic metabolic disease in these groups. For example, those of south Asian origin living in the UK type 2 diabetes is 2.5 -5 times more prevalent and three times more common in those of African-Caribbean descent in comparison to Caucasians.

europeanscientist.com

How to reverse type 2 diabetes

Keto, News

I’m not diabetic and perhaps it’s because I’ve been living by a ketogenic friendly diet and intermittent fasting for a couple decades. When I learned that intermittent fasting was a thing I ran into information from Dr. Jason Fung and read his book, “The Obesity Code”. It’s a good read and extremely informative but, if you’re not into reading, here is a short video that can get you started on reversing your type 2 diabetes as well as lose weight at the same time. As always, consult your doctor as well as I’m not a physician (although Dr. Jason Fung is so you can take his word for it if you like).

For more information and the rest of the video series you’ll have to sign up to dietdoctor.com.

New short term study shows benefit of keto diet for those with type 2 diabetes

Keto, News

It’s always good to see a new study showing how a simple change in diet can help to treat type 2 diabetes. Not only is it natural but it’s FREE.

Following a ketogenic diet lowers blood glucose and HbA1c levels in people with type 2 diabetes, new research shows.
A short-term study by Indian researchers found that the diet’s benefits led to “great improvements” in symptoms associated with type 2 diabetes.

diabetes.co.uk

Going low-carb improves the ability to regulate blood sugar

Keto, News

Another study is showing that limiting intake of carbohydrates allows those with Type-2 Diabetes to better control their blood sugar.

Patients with type 2 diabetes improve their ability to regulate blood sugar levels if they eat food with a reduced carbohydrate content and an increased share of protein and fat. This is shown by a recent study conducted at Bispebjerg Hospital in collaboration with, among other partners, Aarhus University and the Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports at the University of Copenhagen. The findings are contrary to the conventional dietary recommendations for type 2 diabetics.
Nutritional therapy is important to treat the type 2 diabetes optimally, but the recommendations are unclear. According to the Danish Health Authority, up to 85% of newly diagnosed patients with type 2 diabetes are overweight, and they are typically advised to follow a diet focused on weight loss: containing less calories than they burn, low fat content and a high content of carbohydrates with a low ‘glycaemic index’ (which indicates how quickly a food affects blood sugar levels).

eurekalert.org

Is the Zero Carb Diet the right diet for you?

Keto, News, Opinion

India Times takes a look at the Zero Carb diet. I’m not much for the idea of cutting all carbs out. I think that if you’re trying to lose weight or control your blood sugar levels you can still eat carbs but just a limited amount. But, maybe if you’re looking for a quick temporary fix to lose a lot of weight this just might be the thing for you.

Following a zero-carb diet might help you lose weight and control your blood sugar level to some extent but is unnecessary in a longer run. As a low-carb will also show similar results without strict restrictions. A complete ban of any nutrient is never an advisable option as each nutrient has some or the other vital function in the body. We should consume a balanced diet for healthy living.

India Times

Type 1 Diabetic finds intermittent fasting made life easier

Fasting

I wasn’t aware a Type 1 Diabetic could fast at all. I always thought they had to keep their blood sugar at a certain level otherwise they could suffer some severe reactions. You learn something new every day!

Intermittent fasting also provided a more Zen-like approach to my waking hours, a change that I soon came to realize I desperately craved. Because by no longer eating three to five meals a day, my mental load — the one I have from living with diabetes — went “poof.”
Dr. Jake Kushner, a pediatric endocrinologist formerly at Baylor College of Medicine and now with McNair Interests, a private equity firm, understood my pain. “People with diabetes can slay it really well, but they have to wake up tomorrow and slay it again,” he said, something I knew well from my life with Type 1.

The New York Times