4 Tension Relief Tactics for Households in Self-Isolation

Blog

Sheila Johnson of wellshelia.net

Have tensions in your household been growing since your family initially went into self-isolation because of the COVID-19 pandemic? When you’re facing an unprecedented challenge, it can be hard to keep your emotions in check – and everyone in your household is probably struggling to do the same. With life slowly beginning to feel normal again, it’s time to nip those tensions in the bud. Here’s how to help your family get back on track with healthy habits, discover new hobbies, and find opportunities to unplug.

Get Back to Healthy Basics

Perhaps ordering takeout or getting delivery has been a common occurrence in your household since the pandemic began. But if it feels like everyone has been in a bad mood lately, an unhealthy diet might be the root cause – and poor nutrition can actually raise your risk of catching COVID-19.

If mealtime in your family has been lacking healthy sources of fat and protein, it’s time to get into the kitchen together and start whipping up some keto-inspired dishes. Pack in the avocados, crack a few eggs, and don’t be afraid to go heavy on olive oil or butter for flavoring – all of these tasty, filling ingredients will help your family feel more energized and motivated! Cooking with your kids can be a great bonding activity, but Epicurious does recommend keeping sharp kitchen tools out of their reach for safety reasons.

Remember you can always look to Keto Kooking for information, recipes and ideas that will keep your diet well rounded and packed with solid nutrition!

Burn Off Stress

There’s no way around it: the COVID-19 pandemic has been a stressful time for everyone. If you’re hoping to boost the overall mood in your household, exercising is one of the best ways to relieve stress. According to PsychCentral, exercise releases endorphins, which can alleviate negative emotions and help you calm down.

Cycling in particular is a great way for people of all ages to get fit, have fun, and spend some more time out of the house! When you’re cruising with your feet on the pedals, you’ll feel like you’re leaving your stress in the dust. It’s the ideal tonic for these trying times.

And cycling does not have to be an expensive sport – you can easily find a quality bike on a budget! For example, the Firmstrong Urban Lady Beach Cruiser Bicycle is only $250, and Kent Oakwood Men’s Cruiser Bike is priced at a mere $150. If you’d prefer, you could also purchase an affordable, indoor stationary bike for your household, like the ProGear 555LXT, which retails for $200.

Kick Out Boredom

Is your family getting bored with their usual routines and hobbies? Boredom can definitely exacerbate existing household tensions, so it may be time to introduce your family to a new pastime. For instance, both children and adults can have fun playing online games! If you and your kids want to get started with multiplayer games like Fortnite, you’ll need to ensure that your Internet connection can handle the demands. To increase download speeds and allow for smoother gameplay, research your options for fiber optic connections from companies like Verizon.

Make Time to Unplug

While gaming can be fun, it’s also important to balance hobbies like this with time away from screens. With so many activities going virtual over the past few months, tension within your family may have arisen because you haven’t spent enough time connecting in person. Getting out into nature together just might be the perfect solution. You could plan a weekend camping trip or a fun beach day, or you could stay close to home by playing in a local park or simply hanging out in your backyard! This is a great way to unplug for a few hours (or days) and just relax.

Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, every family has dealt with arguments, disappointments, and clashing emotions. But if you’re proactive about addressing household tensions, you can lift your family’s spirits. Don’t brush those tensions under the rug – instead, work to alleviate them now, so you can enjoy your time at home as we recover from this pandemic.

Photo via Pexels

Metabolic Syndrome is growing in the United States

Blog

It’s been shown over the last several months that those from metabolic syndrome are most vulnerable to COVID-19. The inflammation associated with this syndrome is what puts the immune system into overdrive causing massive complications. If Americans are to improve their resistance to this virus we are going to have to adopt diets that are low in carbohydrates and restrict processed foods. Whole food eating as it’s being called today is the best medicine.

“It’s about lifestyle. Diet, exercise, healthy food choices,” Dr. Robert Wong, a gastroenterologist at Stanford University in California and a study author, told Healthline. “The U.S. health system says this a lot, but it’s not working.”

The study found that the overall percent of people in the United States with metabolic syndrome has edged up to 37.

However, a deep dive into older Americans as well as subgroups such as the Hispanic population finds the numbers soaring more than 50 percent.

Healthline

How to protect yourself against COVID-19

Blog

Sheila Johnson of wellshelia.net

With No End in Sight Just Yet, Taking Actions Against COVID-19 Is Still a Must

It’s been several weeks since the COVID-19 outbreak started, and it can be argued that we’re still very much in its throes. With no official vaccines or medications just yet, it definitely doesn’t look like the end is in sight. For this reason, it’s important to stay informed, stay safe, and stay healthy as these are still the best ways to fight the coronavirus.

All Facts, No Myths

With the barrage of information available on COVID-19, differentiating the facts from the fallacies can spell the difference between life and death.

  • At this point in the pandemic, it’s less important to focus on where COVID-19 started, as opposed to the countries that are now affected.
  • Certain population groups have higher risks of severe infection, such as the elderly.
  • Those with underlying health conditions such as diabetes, lung and heart disease, etc. are also especially vulnerable.
  • Close contact and exposure to respiratory droplets of the infected remain the virus’ most prevalent mode of transmission.

A Body Equipped to Fight

COVID-19 will do everything it can to threaten your body, so you want to keep it strong, healthy, and better armed to fend off the unseen threat.

  • Staying home is the best way to stay healthy, but you also need to take measures at home to protect and maintain both your physical and mental health.
  • You can eat healthy without resorting to junk food by making use of delicious and healthy recipes using only fresh ingredients.
  • Doing exercises at home is a great way to stay fit while your gym is closed.
  • Even at home, be mindful of what you expose your body to, so choose DIY safety products you need, such as face masks, hand sanitizers, etc.

A COVID-19-Free Home

Your home is your sanctuary from the pandemic, but the fact is, it’s really only as safe and as virus-free as you endeavor to make it.

Perhaps we’re already seeing the tail-end of the pandemic. But until we’ve truly flattened the curve and we know for certain that it’s safe to venture back into the world and resume the lives that we’ve had to put on pause, erring on the side of caution is still best.

Photo via Pexels.com

Poor metabolic health is the weakness that allows COVID-19 to kill

Blog

It’s not the virus that is the big killer. It’s the virus plus the Standard American Diet (SAD). The US will suffer the most because we are the least metabolically healthy.

The map above shows where U.S residents are at increased risk for severe Covid-19 illness, compared with the national average. It is based on the estimated proportion of adults in each county who have one or more of these conditions: diabetes, high blood pressure, obesity, heart disease and chronic lung disease, using survey data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

A majority of patients hospitalized with Covid-19 in the New York City area, an early epicenter of the nation’s outbreak, had one or more underlying health conditions. Studies from the C.D.C. and others suggest that, once infected with the coronavirus, people with such conditions are at particular risk for severe illness, including hospitalization and death. The conditions do not on their own increase a person’s chance of catching the disease.

New York Times

The latest on COVID-19 and obesity

Blog

According to the study authors, one way that obesity might increase the risk of severe COVID-19 involves respiratory dysfunction.

People with obesity are more likely to have higher resistance in their airways, lower lung volumes, and weaker respiratory muscles, which are critical in the defense against COVID-19. These factors make an individual more likely to develop pneumonia, and they place additional stress on the heart.

Medical News Today

Poor metabolic health increases vulnerability to COVID-10

Blog

If there was ever a time to get your metabolic health in order it’s now. The biggest risk factors for having severe reactions or even death, other than age, with regard to COVID-19 is obesity, Type-2 Diabetes, and other associated conditions from metabolic syndrome.

Despite our nation’s ability to produce so much healthful food, fewer than one American adult in five is metabolically healthy, Dr. Dariush Mozaffarian, dean of the Freidman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University, had told me the week before. He cited a recent national report describing poor diet as “now the leading cause of poor health in the U.S.” and the cause of more than half a million deaths per year.

Dr. Mozaffarian explained that poor metabolic health was the immunity-impairing factor underlying cardiovascular disease, Type 2 diabetes and obesity-related cancers that left so many nutritionally compromised Americans especially vulnerable to the lethal coronavirus now all but paralyzing the country.

“Only 12 percent of Americans are without high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes or pre-diabetes,” he said in an interview last week. “The statistics are horrifying, but unlike Covid they happened gradually enough that people just shrugged their shoulders. However, beyond age, these are the biggest risk factors for illness and death from Covid-19.”

The New York Times

The New York Times stumbles in the story above by promoting fruit, vegetables, and whole grains when the current science shows that most fruits, some vegetables, and all grains are not that good for you. The current science shows that protein needs to be the star followed by saturated fat (the fat that comes with the meat) and non-root vegetables like broccoli, cauliflower, and kale. Fruit should largely be ignored with the exception of berries and maybe grapefruit.

The best part about getting your metabolic health on the right track is that it doesn’t take that long to start the reversal process. Once you get started on low carbohydrate consumption your body responds by making you more sensitive to insulin. You’ll stop spiking your glucose levels and quickly move on the path to better metabolic health.

That’s not to say it’s super easy. If you’re addicted to breads and sugar it will be difficult… at first. But, anyone can do it as long as you concentrate on satiety. That feeling of being full. Reducing carbohydrates and replacing them with protein and fat will leave you feeling satiated longer.

I suggest you start with the books I have listed here on my site. They lay it all out on how to get started. ketokooking.com/books

Worse outcomes for COVID-19 patients with Diabetes

Blog

If there aver was a time to reduce your carb consumption this is it. Those with diabetes seem to have a much worse time with the COVID-19 virus. More than ever before Metabolic Health is important.

While anyone is susceptible to contracting the new coronavius, people with diabetes or metabolic syndrome — a cluster of conditions that, occurring together, increase the likelihood of developing diabetes — are among those most at risk of becoming gravely ill if they get COVID-19.

Dallas Morning News

Metabolic Health looks to be the new focus in fighting COVID-19

Blog

Story after story crops up regarding the COVID-19 pandemic and its effects on people who have Type-2 Diabetes and/or are obese. The virus seems to affect people with these conditions regardless of age. Many times I’ve seen reports of a relatively young person (below 40 years old) with no underlying health conditions dying from the virus. Then when the show the photo of the person they appear to be obese.

What is the underlying cause of Type-2 Diabetes and obesity? Doctors on social media keep referring to “metabolic syndrome” and “metabolic health.” And it appears that this goes back to insulin resistance and the low carb movement in diet.

Carbohydrate consumption triggers a flood of insulin in your blood stream. The more this happens the more your body adjusts to having so much of it in your blood. This makes insulin less effective at doing its job thereby increasing the flow of insulin in your body. This leads to the viscous cycle in diabetics of increasing their insulin dosage to get their blood sugar levels down. Which in turn makes them less sensitive to insulin. Which in turn requires higher doses. The use of insulin is heavily tied to weight gain because glucose is removed from your blood and shoved into your fat cells.

All this information is in Dr. Jason Fung’s books, “The Obesity Code” and “The Diabetes Code.

So it may seem that the best defense against COVID-19 is to get our metabolic health in order. That requires reducing consumption of carbohydrates and highly processed foods. Getting back to the basics of meat and vegetables and cooking at home looks like the best treatment. It requires no pharmaceuticals and will help with weight loss. The best part is you don’t have to spend money on fancy diet books or weight loss programs.

Obesity may be one of the most important predictors of severe coronavirus illness, new studies say. It’s an alarming finding for the United States, which has one of the highest obesity rates in the world.

Though people with obesity frequently have other medical problems, the new studies point to the condition in and of itself as the most significant risk factor, after only older age, for being hospitalized with Covid-19, the illness caused by the coronavirus. Young adults with obesity appear to be at particular risk, studies show.

New York Times

But Dr. David A. Kessler, a former commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, has a simple message for people who want to keep their metabolic health and weight in check when temptation is just a few steps from their work space: Try to avoid eating foods that contain what he calls “fast carbs,” such as refined grains, starches, corn and sugar.

These foods, like bagels, bread, breakfast cereals, juices, tortilla chips and anything made with processed flour, tend to be highly processed and devoid of fiber. They are rapidly absorbed and converted to glucose in the body, causing blood sugar and insulin levels to spike and preventing the release of hormones that quench hunger. Over time, researchers have found, this pattern of eating can wreak havoc on metabolic health, leading to weight gain and increasing the risk of Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, conditions that can increase the risk of complications from Covid-19.

New York Times

Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) seems to be a risk factor for acquiring the new coronavirus infection. Indeed, T2DM and hypertension have been identified as the most common comorbidities for other coronavirus infections, such as severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS-CoV)1. According to several reports, including those from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), patients with T2DM and the metabolic syndrome might have up to ten-times greater risk of death when they contract COVID-19 (CDC coronavirus reports). Although T2DM and the metabolic syndrome increase the risk of more severe symptoms and mortality in many infectious diseases, there are some additional specific mechanistic aspects in coronavirus infections that require separate consideration, which will have clinical consequences for improved management of patients who are severely affected.

nature.com

A recent commentary In Nature states that “patients with type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome might have to up 10 times greater risk of death when they contract COVID-19” and has called for mandatory glucose and metabolic control of type 2 diabetes patients to improve outcomes. The authors also suggest making this a priority in ALL patients with COVID 19 will be beneficial. (12) It’s instructive to note that the disproportionate numbers of those from black and ethnic minority backgrounds succumbing to the virus may in part be explained by a significantly increased risk of chronic metabolic disease in these groups. For example, those of south Asian origin living in the UK type 2 diabetes is 2.5 -5 times more prevalent and three times more common in those of African-Caribbean descent in comparison to Caucasians.

europeanscientist.com

The word is out. The Keto Diet can’t protect you from contracting COVID-19

Blog

File this under DUH!

If you believe that any diet makes you less susceptible to contracting any viral infection then I have a bridge to sell you in Manhattan.

And we can’t believe we have to ask this: Can the keto diet stop you from contracting the coronavirus if it ever finds its way into your system?

The answer is no. And we mean that in every way possible. Despite that, people are somehow justifying keto more, saying that the vitamins in the meat are essential for our immune system, while there’s another that even made a convoluted argument about mortality rates and metabolic syndrome. It’s also worth noting that that person is an entrepreneur with #KETO in their twitter bio, so make of it what you will.

medicaldaily.com

Here’s a couple more links. Come on people! You should know better.

https://vitals.lifehacker.com/no-the-keto-diet-wont-give-you-special-protection-from-1842057362

https://metro.co.uk/2020/03/10/dont-believe-people-telling-keto-diet-will-prevent-coronavirus-12375607/