Are we counting carbs wrong?

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Personally, I don’t count carbs at all. I don’t know how many I consume in a day. I don’t track macros either. What I do, and it’s a practice I’ve had for decades now, is eat mostly meat and vegetables that are cooked at home. If I do look at a label to see the carb count I don’t look at “net carbs” where you subtract the fiber from the carbohydrates to make you feel like you’re eating fewer carbs. I look at the total carbs and if a single serving is in the double digit range I might skip it depending on what else I’m eating that day.

I generally don’t eat breads, pastas, rice, or other grains. I stay away from potatoes and other starchy root vegetables. I do have them on occasion but they are not a mainstay of my diet. I might consume them once per month or so.

Shulz and her co-author, Joanne Slavin, a professor of nutrition and food science at the University of Minnesota, suggest looking at carb quality rather than quantity. When it comes to the quality of carbohydrates, they recommend looking at factors such as the percentage of whole grains, whether there’s any added sugar, the total amount of fiber, and the ratio of total carbohydrates to the amount of fiber and added sugar.

If these factors can be summed in one sentence, it would be: “Eat more unprocessed food.” This is something that we all know is good for us in theory, but when it comes to the many, many food choices we make every day, it can be all too easy to just focus on the quantity of carbs, rather than the quality, letting the fruits and vegetables fall to the wayside.

We’re Counting Carbs All Wrong (lifehacker.com)

NYT blames meat first for obesity and COVID-19

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Jane Brody of the New York Times has it right when she calls out obesity and Type-2 diabetes for being high risk factors for severe cases of COVID-19. This has been known since almost the beginning of the pandemic. What she doesn’t get right unnecessarily blaming meat.

Of course, in recent decades many of the policies of the department Mr. Vilsack now heads have contributed mightily to Americans’ access to inexpensive foods that flesh out their bones with unwholesome calories and undermine their health. Two telling examples: The government subsidizes the production of both soybeans and corn, most of which is used to feed livestock.

Not only does livestock production make a major contribution to global warming, much of its output ends up as inexpensive, often highly processed fast foods that can prompt people to overeat and raise their risk of developing heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure and kidney disease. But there are no subsidies for the kinds of fruits and vegetables that can counter the disorders that render people more vulnerable to the coronavirus.

New York Times

It’s not meat that is the problem here. It’s the highly processed foods, sugars, and other excessive carbohydrates that we pump into our bodies. She does talk about the rest of the bad things in the average person’s diet later in the column. But I think those things should have been mentioned first because beef, chicken, and pork will not cause a person to become obese.

Keto, Beans, and Carbs

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Should you eat beans while on the ketogenic diet? You can, but you have to limit the quantity. Also, some beans are higher in carbs than others. Personally I would concentrate on fresh beans like green beans and asparagus beans or other vegetables like snow peas or other peapods. There are fewer carbs and more fiber in fresh beans and peas so your intake of net carbs will be far fewer than if eating dried beans.

Most beans are too high in carbs to be staples on the keto diet. However, with careful planning, you can include small servings of beans occasionally. Always be sure to check labels for added sugars, though.

Green beans and black soybeans are keto-friendly bean options, each containing only 2 grams of net carbs per 1/2-cup (60–90-gram) serving.

Some promising keto substitutes for beans include mushrooms, eggplant, avocado, ground meat, and boiled peanuts.

Healthline.com

What is keto rash?

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Personally, I’ve never experienced keto rash but I empathize with those that contract it. Rashes are never pleasant. The good news is that it supposedly is easily treated. The bad news is one of the treatments is to increase carbohydrates to move out of ketosis.

Keto rash is a rare form of dermatitis, or skin inflammation. It is an itchy and uncomfortable rash that develops on the upper body.
A ketogenic diet is one possible cause of a keto rash. This diet is growing in popularity because ketosis offers a range of potential health benefits, including promoting weight loss.

medicalnewstoday.com

For athletes, supplementing with ketones is different than simply being on the keto diet

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I didn’t think this was in dispute. I don’t recall reading anywhere claims being made that simply being on the keto diet will enhance athletes’ performance. I do recall reading how simply being on the keto diet and becoming fat adapted will enhance the athletic performance of regular people. But, these are normal people who aren’t doing competitive athletics. I think the jury is still out on pro athletes and going strictly keto. There may be times when pros bodies require a quick hit of carbohydrates to perform at their peak.

The keto diet is often not the performance boosting mechanism it is claimed to be, according to an expert who plans to set the record straight at NutraIngredients’ Sports Nutrition Summit next month.

The three-day event is set to investigate some of the biggest trends in the industry and answer burning questions on how different diets influence sports performance and how industry players can best meet the needs of these athletes.

Dr Mark Evans, postdoctoral researcher at University College Dublin, will explain how the keto diet has been touted as a way to take of advantage of the body’s large fat stores to fuel exercise for longer and improve exercise performance, however, it’s important to consider how intense that exercise is going to be.

nutraingredients.com

Here’s what happens when you stop eating sugar

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Image by congerdesign from Pixabay

You probably already know the answer. But, I think it probably needs to be repeated until we stop thinking about diet in the traditional way.

Giving up the sweet stuff is challenging since it’s found in unsuspecting places, like veggie burgers, tomato sauce, and crackers. But if you do nix added sugars from your diet, your body will benefit almost immediately, according to Dr. Eric Pham, M.D. at St. Joseph’s Hospital in Orange, California.
Within a week you can expect lower blood pressure as well as healthier levels of fat and insulin levels in the bloodstream, he says.

Men’s Health