Study: Metabolic Syndrome on the Rise

News

Some of the unchanging facts during the COVID-19 pandemic is that most of the people that are having severe reactions and having difficulty recovering are those with metabolic syndrome.

What is metabolic syndrome?

Metabolic syndrome is a clustering of at least three of the five following medical conditions: abdominal obesity, high blood pressure, high blood sugar, high serum triglycerides, and low serum high-density lipoprotein (HDL).

Wikipedia

If you are suffering from these illnesses you are at a higher risk of death from COVID-19 than the rest of the population.

Some components of metabolic syndrome, such as obesity and hypertension, are associated with more severe COVID-19. Separately, research shows higher rates of infection, hospitalization, and deaths from COVID-19 among some racial and ethnic groups.

For example, hospitalization rates for COVID-19 among Blacks and Hispanics are four to five times higher than for non-Hispanic white people. Health disparities associated with COVID-19 may reflect a complex combination of elements — not just age and chronic medical conditions, but also genetic, social, environmental, and occupational factors. Similar factors probably play a role in why metabolic syndrome affects, and is rising in, some groups more than others. This is an area of active (and much needed) research.

Harvard

This latest study from Harvard shows that metabolic syndrome is on the rise and is especially escalating in women, Asians, and Hispanics.

A new study explores how common metabolic syndrome is and who is getting it. Researchers analyzed survey data from more than 17,000 people who were representative of the US population in gender, race, and ethnicity. While the overall prevalence of metabolic syndrome increased slightly between 2011 and 2016 — going from 32.5% to 36.9% — it increased significantly among

women (from 31.7% to 36.6%)
adults ages 20 to 39 (from 16.2% to 21.3%)
Asian (from 19.9% to 26.2%) and Hispanic (from 32.9% to 40.4%) adults.

Harvard

One of the tools to reverse metabolic syndrome is to immediately lower your carbohydrate intake and the Keto Diet is a great way to accomplish that. Of course, always seek your doctor’s advice before making any changes in your diet.

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